Instinct, Emotion and Reason

Before I dig in here today I want to give credit where it’s due. I was inspired to consider what I’m about to go into here by a quick-hit Tweet from Illimitable Man. I didn’t bookmark it so I apologize for not linking it here today, but the general gist of it was about the mental processes humans go through when we’re presented with environmental stimuli that demands interpretation and a behavioral response. I considered this process quite a bit while I was studying behavioral psychology – Instinct, Emotion and Reason (or rationality if you prefer) – and I’m almost embarrassed that I haven’t covered this in terms of a Red Pill perspective in over 600 essays now.

The idea is fairly simple; when we are prompted by environmental (and sometimes internal) stimuli human beings process this information using three psychological mechanisms – our primal instincts, our emotional interpretations and our rational (reason) facilities. I’m not sure these processes get their proper due in Red Pill theory today.  I’ve detailed all of these processes individually for years on this blog, but generally they were outlined in the context of whatever topic I was focusing on. In this essay I’m going to elaborate on these aspects individually. Later, as part of this series, I’ll explore how they act in concert for our overall cognitive process, and then how they influence intersexual and intersocial dynamics. I think this is a useful exercise because a lot of foundational Red Pill ideas stem from these processes as well as the social conventions and interpretive priorities the Feminine Imperative relies on today.

For sake of clarity I am going to use a few behavioral psych terms like stimuli in this essay. This isn’t to throw $10 words at you, it’s just easier to elaborate on these processes with abstract terms. For example, when I use stimuli I mean any physical, environmental or cognitive prompt that our conscious or unconscious mind demands an interpretation, processing of and response to. That can be a wide variety of things so, stimuli serves as a general term.

Lastly, the following here is my interpretation of these processes. While a lot of this will align pretty well with established theories, this is my take on them and not some official, settled science of facts. If you think I’m full of shit please tell me why, this is still a work in progress for me.

Instinct

Instinct seems like the easiest of these processes to understand, but it’s really the cognitive aspect that’s most misunderstood, marginalized and often demonized. The reason for this is because our instincts reside in our subconscious (hindbrain) processing of stimuli. When I refer to men or women’s evolved mental firmware in my essays it’s our instinctual process that I’m referring to. These are the unlearned, inborn aspects of our human nature that influence the other processes and remain largely in our subconscious. Our instinctual processing is a direct result of our evolution. It evolved as a vitally necessary aspect of our cognitive processing in that it aided in our ability to survive in, and adapt to, a chaotic, primal environment when food was scarce, predators and rivals wanted us dead, and reproductive opportunities and raising a child to a survivable age were at a premium.

There are a lot of examples of our instinct level processing and each instinctual response triggers more complex processing up the cognitive chain through emotion and reason. If we were presented with a dangerous stimuli (a sabertooth tiger) our instinctual process triggers a fight or flight response physically in our bodies (adrenaline release). Needless to say this was an evolved adaptation that served our species well and was passed along genetically as part of our mental firmware. I’m going to use some simplistic examples here but, if you really want to dig into our preloaded mental firmware and how we developed it I would suggest looking into the earlier works of Dr. Steven Pinker and The Red Queen by Matt Ridley (I’ll post links in the comments).

Another example is human beings’ innate fear (reservations at least) of snakes and spiders – poisonous animals that looked easy to kill, but could kill humans without warning. That’s an example of relatively beneficial firmware, but the reason instinct gets a bad rep is due to the instincts that once were beneficial to us individually, but are less beneficial to us socially. Greed and gluttony were very practical, instinctually motivated behaviors that stemmed from a need to survive in a time when resources were scarce. Today greed is (mostly) seen as anti-social and a compulsion to overeat in a time when food is abundant is why we presently have an obesity epidemic.

Those are easily understood examples, but where things get more complex is in how our instinctual process influences the other processes (emotion and reason). Instinct gets demonized because in our ‘enlightened‘ era we like to believe that instinct is more trouble than it is beneficial. Most of that is due to a belief that our other processes are superior to (or at least should supersede) our instincts. Most of what we call sin or immoral behavior is motivated by the instinctual process. In fact, the only time our instinctual awareness and reactions are really credited with anything positive is when it gets us out of some life threatening situation or it leads to some prosocial outcome. For instance, the male instinct to protect women by putting ourselves between them and danger; that’s an instinct and resultant behavior (seemingly altruistic male self-sacrifice) that gets a lot of praise in our feminine-primary social order. However, for the most part, we tend to judge ‘baser instincts’ as a net negative.

The truth about the instinctual process is that none of our other processes function at full efficiency without it. Today, as a result of our feminine-primary acculturation, we want to relegate instinct’s influence to something “we’ve evolved beyond”. The popular consensus is we’ve raised ourselves above base instincts by either acknowledging the importance of the emotional process or that rationality and the self-control based on it immunizes us from its influence. Not only are these belief foolish and hubristic, they’re provably untrue. When it comes to concepts like the ‘selfish gene‘ and the physical differences in the evolved instinctual processes of men and women, it becomes necessary for a social order based on blank-slate equalism to demonize and marginalize the influence of, and behaviors attributed to, instinct.

The survival benefits and behaviors that make up the instinctual process were so necessary that they had to become part of our unconscious species firmware. Because the instinctual process is part of our animalistic hindbrain mental subroutines it’s something we have little or no direct control over until its effect is brought (often forced) into our conscious awareness. As such, and because we prefer to think of ourselves as emotional and rational beings, we tend to think of the influence of instinct as something we either have or need to have mastery over, and to a large extent this mastery makes sense. The truth is that instinct is an aspect of ourselves that needs to be controlled as well as embraced depending on circumstances.

Emotion

From an evolutionary perspective, the emotional process of interpreting stimuli is a mechanism of how our brains and biochemistry interact to affect our moods, demeanor and ’emotionality’ in response to both instinctual cues and the raw information of stimuli itself. Furthermore, the emotional process can also be influenced and/or modified by the rational process. I’m trying to be concise here, but our emotional response to information/stimuli is very much an evolved dynamic with latent purposes and practical functionalities. I’m making this distinction here because for millennia we’ve raised the effects of emotion to a mythical, metaphysical, importance.

While emotion often has immediate effects on us, emotion also has long term effect with regard to the stimuli it processes. There are dozens of definitions of emotions and there’s no way I’m going to lay them all out for you here. However, popular psychology asserts that there are as many as ten and as few as six base emotions:

  • Anger.
  • Disgust.
  • Fear.
  • Happiness.
  • Sadness.
  • Surprise.

Sometimes Contempt is added to this list. If these seem overly simplistic they are, again, abstracts to build more complex emotions on (some paleo-researchers insist there are only four base emotions across our evolved ethno-histories). For our purposes these base emotions will serve to show the connections between the instinctual process which prompts them and the rational process that modifies and sometimes informs them.

Each of these emotional responses is prompted by how our senses, brain and then instinctual process interprets a stimuli. Again, using our sabertooth tiger example, the instinctual process determines imminent danger and triggers a synaptic and hormonal response to that danger. As a result of that instinctual process an emotional process and response is triggered – likely fear (flight in most cases), but sometimes anger (fight).

Another example: you see an arousing woman (stimuli) at a party who is displaying behavioral cues and environmental indicators of interest (IOIs). Your instinctual process determines a high potential for a reproductive opportunity. From there the emotional process kicks in: hormones and dopamine (and not a small testosterone spike) that your instinctual process triggered flushes your system and serves as the basis for your emotional process to form an emotional response to the same stimuli. If it all passes the smell test that response (hopefully) will be happiness (and a little surprise mixed in).

There is a visceral biochemical interrelation between emotion and the stimuli/instinct relation that prompts the reaction. Adrenaline is one easy example, another is oxytocin or the “love hormone”. This is a bit of a mischaracterization of the hormone. Oxytocin induces feelings of trust and comfort and is thought to be a significant factor in human’s forming pair bonds and parental investments. There’s a lot more to oxytocin’s implications to our evolution than that, but for now lets look at how our biology influences the emotional process.

We proceed from stimuli to an instinctual response. If there is nothing mitigating that response (such as a rationally learned buffer to mitigate it) the next step in the chain is a biological reaction to that instinct – such as dumping adrenaline into our bloodstream or a post-orgasm flush of oxytocin after sex. From there the emotional process picks up the interpretation of this information as prompted by the cocktail of chemicals moving through our bloodstream and affecting our mental and physical interpretation of that stimuli. That biochemical factor prompts one, or a combination, of the base emotions listed above.

From there more complex emotions (feelings) and combinations thereof begin to form an emotional interpretation and response. This emotional response can be anything from a fast, reflexive one to a more nuanced and contemplative one. Furthermore, this emotional interpretation and response can also be modified by our rational mental process as well as our gendered capacity to process emotions. One thing to bear in mind about our emotional process is that it can imprint its interpretations into our ‘hard memory’ – sometimes so significantly that the memory of that stimuli can re-trigger that physical and emotional response.

Gender-modified interpretation of our emotion process is an important aspect to consider in Red Pill praxeology and one I’ll be elaborating on in the next part of this series. Until recently the accepted ‘science‘ about our emotional process has been based on a blank-slate equalist approach to emotion. In fact we still suffer from the outdated presumptions of academia that both men and women process emotion in the same manner, and, in theory, ought to be expected to have an equal capacity to interpret, respond and express emotion. In light of new technology and new research in a variety of interrelated disciplines we know this is old presumption is patently untrue. Men and women have different mental hardware and are born with different mental firmware. Both sexes interpret and process emotion in gender-specific manners.

I’ll be getting into the personal and social implications that the legacy of this (deliberate) misunderstanding presents in the next essay. For now it’s important to consider that human beings have an innate predisposition to elevate the emotional process above instinct and reason. Likely this is due the to the survival dependency we had on our feelings in our evolutionary past. In a time when we lacked the greater rational facilities and information we’ve developed in our more recent past, depending on and learning from emotion, and the latent purposes it serves, was a species-beneficial system. We depended on our emotions to guide our behaviors (long and short term) for us more in our prehistory when we lacked the more developed rational process we take for granted now. Emotions served latent evolutionary purposes for us in our prehistory and today are still overly emphasized – often to metaphysical attributes – as superior to reason. More on this soon.

Reason

The final piece of our interpretive process is reason, or rationality (I’ll use these interchangeably). Ironically, for all of the social preconceptions that our emotions have made us “more evolved” above instinct, it is our rational process that has evolved us above both instinct and emotion. From and evolutionary standpoint our rational process is a relatively recent development; pushing us past the limitations of instinct and emotion. The definition of rationality is the quality of being based on or in accordance with reason or logic. It is the quality of being able to think sensibly or logically and being endowed with the capacity to reason.

Biologically it’s postulated that our larger brains allowed us to develop a capacity for reason, but that doesn’t mean other animals lack the same facility, it’s just that the rational process is less developed (some would say less environmentally necessary) in those animals by order of degree. Dogs, for example, rely primarily on the instinctual process and the mental (vestigial) firmware they’re born with to solve most of their existential/environmental problems. That doesn’t mean that they lack the ability to learn and form novel (adaptive) behaviors using a rudimentary form of logic. Animals can be taught things, but their capacity to form novel ideas and behaviors is limited to their cognitive abilities. Humans, being the apex species on the planet, had the leisure to take the time necessary to evolve a capacity for logic and as such the rational process developed in us.

Of all our interpretive processes reason is the one that takes the longest to function. Our rational process forms our interpretation of stimuli based on information dissociated from the interpretations of instinct and emotion. Reason requires (accurate) knowledge derived from learning and experience, but there is also an improvisational element to the process.

Before I get too far in the weeds here I need to make a distinction; what I’m outlining is the rational mental process we employ to interpret and interact with stimuli, not rationality, the concept of reason or rationalism. That’s important because it’s all too easy to get lost in philosophical implications of reason when we look at the process of how we come to it.

As mentioned above, the rational process modifies the instinctual and emotional processes. Example, in high school, in drivers ed class, we’re taught to turn into a skid rather than turn with the skid. When we’re driving and we find ourselves in a skid our instinctive impulse is to slam on the the breaks and/or, worse still, to turn with the skid. Our self-preservation instincts tells us to do this, but all it does is make a precarious situation worse. However, when we’re taught, and we practice, not hitting the brakes and not turning into the skid, we make this our default reaction and we avoid disaster. This is the rational process interpreting a stimuli and forming a novel behavior that modifies the interpretation of the instinctual process.

The limitation of the rational process is in its necessity to take time to interpret information and develop a new apparatus. Where instinct and emotion are intimately linked with our biological hardware and psychological firmware, the rational process is dissociated from them in the same immediacy. Instinct and emotion are processes that evolved from a survival-need for fast interpretation and reaction. The rational process requires time, repetition and the right biological structures to be effective. Human beings are remarkably fast learners (even with complex challenges), but the learning that the rational process leads to is slow in comparison to instinct and emotion – which are essentially preloaded firmware in humans.

The rational process deals with the nuts and bolts of what we can understand of our reality. From there it can modify the other processes or it can serve to interpret stimuli on its own.

In the next part of this series I’ll be exploring how these cognitive processes interact and cooperate and conflict with each other. I will also consider the gendered advantages and disadvantages these processes represent to our individual experiences as men and women and the influence they play in intersexual and intersocial dynamics.

Published by Rollo Tomassi

Author of The Rational Male and The Rational Male, Preventive Medicine

Leave a Reply

  Subscribe  
Notify of
Sentient
Guest
Sentient
Offline

Gamma of the Year Award “He put real effort into this,” Sheena Greitens writes in the letter, detailing the ex-husband’s alleged stalking conducted prior to revelations about Gov. Greitens’ extramarital affair and the allegations of sexual misconduct that followed. “When I didn’t respond to his anonymous emails, he sent me a letter,” Sheena Greitens said. “When a letter to me didn’t produce the desired response, he contacted my parents. When letters didn’t satisfy him, he made his accusations public on Twitter. And finally, when targeting our family on social media didn’t fulfill his agenda, he secretly recorded his wife admitting… Read more »

Culum Struan
Guest
Culum Struan
Offline

Rugby I think that’s a good first step. No more videos, post text and post your own thoughts and participate in the discussion. If you must post links then provide context for why and use the bitly links and make it relevant to the current discussion (you can start a new discussion too – the point is that no one understands or cares about the random videos with no connection to anything that you post). I know Wala and others have run out of patience with you but if you stick to the above rules I think they will be… Read more »

EhIntellect
Guest
EhIntellect
Offline

“It’s their “dirty secret”. They might tell a GF who’s also a slut” I mentioned this upthread. There’s something to female intuition, knowing which friends, they’ll disclose their dirty secrets and others, no. It’s their own secret sorority? They all want in. Those that don’t make the cut would disclose out of envy. That tying to the soloflex is overwrought. Shit, I’ve been doing this stuff on the cheap apparently. What do I know? Maybe a lot apparently. And yes, D gets messed up, and I mean CPR messed up, when gags and booze/drugs and situational unawareness come together. I’m… Read more »

Sentient
Guest
Sentient
Offline

“Have a nice weekend, make it memorable.”

fleezer
Guest
fleezer
Offline

“See “magic” upthread… or this” nlp stuff is cool. thing that struck me was the next vid in the feed nlp guy says: [location/location -> career/passion] to generate attraction this don’t seem right to me. he’s going for rapport first and mistaking any strong emotion for the specific pattern of emotions that he’s trying to elicit in order to bang i think good initial opening to lock attraction first looks more like: [location/location + tailored disqualification neg -> opinions/secrets/lies + long-term but changable trait neg + steer it into sexual territory] then use the nlp techniques and active listening to… Read more »

walawala
Guest
walawala
Offline

@Culum. Why are you white knighting this troll? Stop it and shut up. You’re not helping by mediating what is already a lost cause. I’m not the only one who feels this way…it’s nkw emerging he has alienated a large group who may otherwise be posting and discussing the original post. This is an online intervention don’t send mixed messages. He needs to be banned for his own good as well as for the good of the community. Rugby go away…. stop spamming and get off the internet. Rollo… it’s time for some tough love here…banning rugby is the only… Read more »

scribblerg
Guest
scribblerg
Offline

@Rugby – Time to sack up and tell these shitheels they can suck your cock. Platinum rule – do whatever the fuck you want, whenever the fuck you want. I actually am not crazy about much of what you share, although occasionally I catch a vid or something you say that really hits me. For me, the scroll button suffices. And it’s not like you are telling others here what to do or setting yourself up as some expert as many do here. My sense is you have a huge mountain to overcome and that participating here is how you… Read more »

walawala
Guest
walawala
Offline

@scribble stop white knighting this idiot and trolling us by encouraging him…

Spamming an Internet forum isn’t in the spirit of the Platinum Rule it’s a sad cry for attention.

He needs to get off the Internet. We’re not here to baby him or anyone else.

fleezer
Guest
fleezer
Offline

“I bet you loved to punch the smallest kid in the class too when you were a kid. Dump on someone who’s up for the fight, not someone you might send into an existential crisis without realizing it.”

if the smallest kid in the class shows up to fight club, going easy on him ruins fight club for him and everyone else

Sentient
Guest
Sentient
Offline

Fleezer NLP – turned to seduction – was the precursor to Mystery’s Method. http://www.seduction.com/media/pdf/Secrets_of_Speed_Seduction_Mastery.pdf https://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/relationships/10982980/The-art-of-the-pickup-how-The-Game-changed-the-game.html A lot of the now familiar PUA terms came out of that context. http://www.pualingo.com/terminology/speed-seduction-nlp/ A lot of things like anchoring, trigger words, fractionating, mirroring etc. are very useful and can be used in building attraction. i.e. f you mentioned Fractionation then I assume you have some NLP knowledge so I’ll talk in those terms… Let’s say I anchor someone to some good-feeling state. If I trigger the anchor, they will obviously move into that state to some extent. Now if that state only had a… Read more »

Sentient
Guest
Sentient
Offline

If you do punch the smallest kid in the class, be sure it’s after you’ve taught them the Second Rule of Fight Club.

http://www.courant.com/breaking-news/hc-br-montville-high-school-fight-club-arrest-20180412-story.html

http://www.trbimg.com/img-5acf7411/turbine/hc-1523545102-pdh70jvwej-snap-image/480/480×270

“I am an idiot” – R. Fish

fleezer
Guest
fleezer
Offline

“Put all the tools in your toolbox.” this is probably the thing that has surprised and delighted me the most i thought that if i kept adding tools, the box would become heavy and impractical this is not the case at all. if anything, it’s almost the opposite because all the tools seem to be related in one way or another, so instead of a tool box, it more resembles a tool map no matter where on the map i start with a girl, i can guide her to the place i want. all i need is a little specific… Read more »

Fred Flange, GBFC (Great Books For Cucks)
Guest
Fred Flange, GBFC (Great Books For Cucks)
Offline

Since Scribbs has dropped by, here is a present for him and you fellow gentlecreatures interested in the evo-psych aspects of Game. Here is what happens when you stomp science with the jackboot of ideology. For quick reference this is the link to I-Think-We’re-All-Bezos-On-This-Bus but it can be found elsewhere, including your local public Fahrenheit 451 pre-burn repositories: Simon Ings: Stalin And The Scientists (2016) https://www.amazon.com/Stalin-Scientists-History-Triumph-1905-1953/dp/0802127592/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1523641071&sr=1-1&keywords=stalin+and+the+scientists The book focuses on biology and genetics, and how the Soviets did their damnedest to officially kill the latter altogether via party fiat (particularly research into chormosone theory prior to Watson & Crick). Brought… Read more »

EhIntellect
Guest
EhIntellect
Offline

Wala Wala “it’s nkw emerging he has alienated a large group who may otherwise be posting and discussing the original post.” Ponting out an internal contradiction of your argument: Rugby can’t simultaneously be irrelavant and impact a large group of potential commenters. Your original complaint re: upload times, btw. Rugby’s conceded some. Time will tell, of course. Law 47 Do not go Past the Mark you Aimed for; In Victory, Learn when to Stop The moment of victory is often the moment of greatest peril. In the heat of victory, arrogance and overconfidence can push you past the goal you… Read more »

kfg
Guest
kfg
Offline

“The job of a racing driver is to win the race at the slowest possible speed.” – Sir Jackie Stewart

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

comment image

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline
EhIntellect
Guest
EhIntellect
Offline

“if the smallest kid in the class shows up to fight club, going easy on him ruins fight club for him and everyone else”

Maybe. Don’t know much about fighting. Mismatches probably have unintended consequences.

Anyhow, here’s an unrelated video:

https://youtu.be/HQVEteeLC3c

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

Well, Rugby was here way before I was. I don’t really have any issues with his postings, but yeah, on my tablet and smartphone it slows things down greatly. If I have time, I watch many of the videos he links.

My 2 cents? I get some of you guy’s frustration, but it’s an unmoderated comment section. Rugby has a unique manner of communicating, and he’s not promoting or selling anything.

In the end, if it really bothers a good number of posters, It’ll be Rollo’s call. In that case, I vote For Rugby.

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

Eh

Everyone who’s read here any length of time knows that I’m a pretty big offender when it comes to posting memes and pictures and videos that aren’t relative to immediate discussions or the OP.

We are all just different enough to make this comment section one of the absolute best in the sphere.

Sentient
Guest
Sentient
Offline

White knightery and frame. Demonstration. c. 2011

Sentient
Guest
Sentient
Offline
EhIntellect
Guest
EhIntellect
Offline

Blax,

It’s good to clear the air occasionally, ain’t it? Have a nice day.

SJF
Guest
SJF
Offline

I wrote this out earlier after I went out to my farm for the afternoon. Perfect weather and nearly a Seals and Crofts Summer Breeze vibe. Before I went to the opening day party for the country club. I was going to do it as a first draft and revise it, but I had such a good time today, I’ll post some random ideas that express about 25% of what I think of the rugby affair: In regards to the rugby affair. Rugby is using this place for therapy. And he should not be. Yes he is clinically retarding the… Read more »

mersonia
Guest
mersonia
Offline

@Rollo

If you love rugby like a brother ban him and help him get off the internet……..(not that it really matters he post the same shit on like 40 different blogs lol)

@Escherlighthouse

Hopefully Rollo rebans your autistic ass also.

walawala
Guest
walawala
Offline

An important part of this community is to be honest starting with ourselves. My post telling rugby to fuck off seems to have triggered some and it’s time for Rugby to man up and get help. Accommodating him only encourages the alcoholic to drink in moderation but it’s a band aid measure. I tried to “Reason” with him a few weeks back… he improved but then went back to his spamming. This online intervention was long overdue. I do recall the realtalk we gave Softek and a few others…no one seemed to mind. Rugby is the special needs child of… Read more »

scribblerg
Guest
scribblerg
Offline

@Sentient – Wow, look at that Blue Pilled ex go. This is the real risk with Beta bitches. Amazing how he decided to fuck up her life because she “didn’t get his best”. Very interesting, thanks for the insights I’m just catching up. Re: Fleezer – Shocking disclosure that he doesn’t find punching the smallest kid in the class problematic. Newsflash for @Fleeze – I’m pretty sure you are an actual sadist. @Walawala – Dude, stop with the dime store psychological bullshit about “white knighting” and “being triggered”. That’s not me. I don’t like or tolerate bullies. Period. Nowhere, never.… Read more »

scribblerg
Guest
scribblerg
Offline

@Walawala – You also seem to see yourself speaking for others here in your abuse of Rugby. On what basis are you using words like “we” and “our”? What authority have you mustered up in that feral mind of your’s? Keep this shit on your account, k?

scribblerg
Guest
scribblerg
Offline

@Sentient – On the Greitens mistress testimony, I’m conflicted. On the one hand, going back after what she experienced is not believable. But on the other, if her account is true, he’s miscalibrated terribly. Let me just play with this for a sec, even if her account isn’t true because I think there is a lesson in there. According to her story, he uses all these manipulative tactics to get her to his house – zero seduction. This is a classic beta tell, trying “trick” a girl into fucking you. I mean the whole “i want to teach you how… Read more »

anon
Guest
anon
Offline

Of the (many, many) false sexual assault accusations I’m familiar with personally, just about all of them involve an angry husband or boyfriend. That’s an immediate red flag to me. They find out, get angry…and then the story becomes “It was against my will….I was duped!” “According to her story, he uses all these manipulative tactics to get her to his house – zero seduction.” What else would she say? Again, all of this fits a pattern and none of us have enough facts to make any judgements here. Nor will we. It’s not the line that matters, it’s how… Read more »

SJF
Guest
SJF
Offline

“Re: Fleezer – Shocking disclosure that he doesn’t find punching the smallest kid in the class problematic. Newsflash for @Fleeze – I’m pretty sure you are an actual sadist.” Lol. Fleezer is not a Sadist. He’s one of those good guy Psychopaths. You know the one that is not in prison yet and the one that doesn’t do harm to people. Scribbler attributes him doing harm to people because you know, Psyhological projection? Domination without feeling? FTW. But then again you might have missed my commentary and tuned out the talk about Kevin Dutton’s The Wisdom of Psychopaths. And the… Read more »

SJF
Guest
SJF
Offline

Yes, Walawala Some one is fucking shitting us as in YGBFSM. It’s as if the incels run the place (inmates running the asylum) that is dedicated to inter-sexual awareness and an advocacy for masculine sexual strategy (Agency) and disparaging the myths of of the Feminine Imperative and Social Conventions aligned against us. Masculine men with our strategy for the betterment of US, our women and children. Blue Pill idealists claiming victim-hood. Law #10 comes into play. Avoid/Devoid the Unhappy and the Unlucky. Funny how YaReally in his exquisite Genius didn’t seem so Happy and Lucky. And how Scray was too… Read more »

SJF
Guest
SJF
Offline

In regards to the rugby affair. Rugby is using this place for therapy. And he should not be. Yes he is retarding the discussions regarding inter-sexual dynamics in the current culture, the awareness of how things are and the myriad of ways of Game in order the become agentic men. 1) A social cognition theory proposed by Stanford University Psychologist Albert Bandura that views people as self-organizing, proactive, self-reflective and self-regulating as times change. An agentic perspective states that we are not merely reactive organisms shaped by environmental forces or driven by inner impulses. We see the world as agents… Read more »

anon
Guest
anon
Offline

Our youngest son just got 4000 likes on ifunny within the first hour.
Anyone give a crap?
No?
Sometimes what you think people give a fuck about, no one gives a fuck about.
Goes both ways, too. I can’t count the number of times I’ve read something that I thought was stupid shite and a few posters later mentioned that it was a great comment.
You just never know.

theasdgamer
Guest

Hopefully Rollo rebans your autistic ass also.

My autistic ass can kick your autistic ass, lol. Autism helps me to focus when I fight. In my last fight, the guy I was fighting was older, bigger, stronger, a better fighter, and had more reach. I beat him exactly how I planned with one blow.

I don’t like to fight, but when I fight, I like to win.

Nah, man, I don’t really wanna fight you–just messin’ witcha.

theasdgamer
Guest

Great comment, anon. XD

anon
Guest
anon
Offline

lol LOL Gamer

ollieoxenfree1
Guest
ollieoxenfree1
Offline

@Scribblerg The irony of your post is you don’t apply the less wrong principle to it. Lets take your disdain for multiculturalism as an example. Britain as a nation has been invaded by the Romans, the Saxons, the Normans and the Vikings (among others). Each conquest leaving it’s mark. The Romans gaves us technological advances such as roads and medicine. The Saxons forced over 90% of the original inhabitants of these shores to flee. Though over time they codified our laws. The Normans settled and improved our armoury and strategic planning in battle. Britain became a home to those fleeing… Read more »

theasdgamer
Guest

The people whose living it was, didn’t want to work those jobs at a sustainable wage to keep those jobs in the west. Ollie, perhaps if you lived in the States for a bit, you might understand our problems better. Britain lacks a border with Mexico, whose people are ambitious and industrious and easily cross the U.S. border illegally to work in the U.S. for often one third the pay of native workers. It’s a very different problem from Britain’s with Pakistanis who are also very industrious, but arrived legally once upon a time. Pakistani immigration can be easily controlled.… Read more »

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

What the west, and specifically America has figured out, is that massive pain and dissatisfaction dissolves societies and exposed ideologies such as ” left and right ” for what they are – the mindless distractions and masturbation that the lazier among the population relish. The pain and disillusionment is postponed by abundant and easy ” credit “. Wanna house? You can get good rates on a 30-40 year mortgage.😁 Want a new car? Everyone gets financed for up to 7 years!! Apply today!!! Wal-Mart has a billion tons of cheap, affordable goods or all kinds. Thanks China…And India… And Pakistan…And… Read more »

theasdgamer
Guest

Multiculturalism has been happening for thousands of years and is the genesis for the United States. The original settlers in the U.S. in any quantity were English who came from Holland and that almost entirely English Culture lasted 2-300 years. We had a few Dutch as well. Then in the nineteenth century came Irish (as cannon fodder for Union armies), Italians for their unskilled labor for which positions were plentiful, and Germans, just because we needed sausages and kraut, lol. If unskilled positions are plentiful, immigration can be good for an economy. If they aren’t, domestic workers take the hit.… Read more »

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

Also, don’t listen to anyone hypothesising about ” immigrants ” from a small observational sample size. The conclusions are mostly wildly inaccurate.

Crony dysfunctional pseudo fascist corporatist government is 100x more damaging than immigration or ” multiculturalism ” see : that thing I reffered to above. Ideologies.😂😂

Blame the ground for the flood.

theasdgamer
Guest

Scribberg, how do you account for a Republican President in Ronald Reagan shipping tens of thousands of U.S. jobs overseas? Lol, a drop in the bucket. In the U..S. we add/lose 300k jobs in a month. The U.S. economy added 300k jobs many months that Reagan was in office. And what’s your opinion of his predecessor President Jimmy Carter warning the American people of whole industries being lost to overseas competitors, if they didn’t curb their unrealistic expectations? Yep, just submit to the bullying of the leftists if you know what’s good for ya. You’re gonna get fucked either way.… Read more »

theasdgamer
Guest

Crony dysfunctional pseudo fascist corporatist government is 100x more damaging than immigration or ” multiculturalism ” see

Blax, your politics are so jejeune.

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

But spot on minis side choosing bullshit.😀

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

Minus….

Sentient
Guest
Sentient
Offline

Blax

“Crony dysfunctional pseudo fascist corporatist government is 100x more damaging than immigration or ” multiculturalism ”

Those things follow FROM the corpokleptocracy.

kfg
Guest
kfg
Offline

“Fighting isn’t enjoyable . . . .”

ollieoxenfree1
Guest

@IRL

“Emotions are their reality and solipsism is the only way in the storm of hormones, too much is happening inside to look outside.”

I had some inkling of this but I couldn’t quite put it into words. Thank you for doing exactly that.

fleezer
Guest
fleezer
Offline

“Shocking disclosure that he doesn’t find punching the smallest kid in the class problematic. Newsflash for @Fleeze – I’m pretty sure you are an actual sadist.” you’re the smartest dickhead here, right? good this isn’t taxpaying voter approved the bell has rung now everybody sit down class. in that class, you bet your smart ass every kid in there has the right to what his fucking taxpaying parent/guardian has bargained for this is the fucking internet, not everyone is special government cheese class “@Fleeze referring to THIS as “Fight Club” in justifying the rough treatment of Rugby” i didn’t justify… Read more »

Sentient
Guest
Sentient
Offline

kfg

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

Asd

The more complex and obscure and complicated a concept or idea is to grasp immediately and understand, the more likely it is to be imbedded with bullshit.

That’s why I understand politics, and call it out for what it is as practiced by the highly political crowd. It’s like a sports team where talent and ability aren’t necessary, but adherents cheer and follow just as closely.

Lol, like arguments between different factions of feminism.

Anonymous Reader
Guest
Anonymous Reader
Offline

Pretty interesting to watch Rollo’s OP play out as different men are triggered at the instinct level by the words of other men, leading to emotional responses using higher reason faculties to fire more words back. Those words then trigger others at the instinct level and around the merry-go-round travels. Great illustrations! PS: Rugby, it is perfectly natural for men to be more visual and less verbal, but you have to push beyond this visual-only stage. Like I said last year, just write a sentence that says a little part of what you need to get out. Then put a… Read more »

ollieoxenfree1
Guest

@theasdgamer April 14 9:50 I often come back to the Carter and Reagan eras when discussing American politics, as this is when America began it’s present course. By the time Bush senior and Clinton were in office there was nothing America could do to arrest it’s long term socio-economic decline. You managed to dismiss the claim of sustainability and trivialise Carter’s prescient warnings while absolving Reagan of blame, when you spoke of the “the bullying left”. This is the cognitive dissonance I was waiting for Scribblerg to subscribe to. Your conclusion is the American people would be worst off regardless.… Read more »

Not Born This Morning
Guest

The fundamental modus operand is bait and feed ad infinitum.

Anonymous Reader
Guest
Anonymous Reader
Offline

Lately I have noticed that at site after site aging Boomers with too much time on their hands are forever dragging any convo off to their own nostalgia. The other day I noticed a discussion about possible war over Syria soon devolved to an argument about Migs vs. F4’s over Viet Nam. It is 2018, and 1968 was fifty (50) years ago, yet there is always some group of Boomers ready to see everything in terms of Nam. It is not quite brain dead, but close. Because Nam was fifty years ago. It would be exactly like some old man… Read more »

kfg
Guest
kfg
Offline

I lost a cousin over Hanoi. Maybe he’s under the sofa with the TV (remember those) remote.

When I was a kid, old people looked at tanks and talked about the old days in the cavalry with actual horses. Now it’s the Boomer’s turn to be the old people.

Your time will come too.

ollieoxenfree1
Guest

@Anonymous Reader

They say history repeats itself.

Don’t you want to learn about the mistakes you’re going to make?

Not Born This Morning
Guest

Anonymous Reader, 50 years from now you will likely be one of those old worn out has been types blathering about past events like they were more significant or relevant to “real” human nature than the present. If you escape that trap, you will be rare indeed. Your implied denigration of those baby boomers blathering about past events is no different than their implied superiority of past experiences. You see, it is only a matter of perspective. Both are looking at the same old dynamic and all of its factors that has been around for far, far longer than them… Read more »

Not Born This Morning
Guest

History does not repeat itself. It echoes.

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline
anon
Guest
anon
Offline

I’ll admit It is more than a little absurd in my estimation when the baby boomers refer to the “Marching for their lives” crowd (which is essentially the same mom demographic as other anti-gun marches**) as “this generation’s Vietnam.

**reference available upon request

boulderhead
Guest

Oliie free one

” The people whose living it was, didn’t want to work those jobs at a sustainable wage to keep those jobs in the west.”

If you had ever employed these workers you would know that the cost per hour is more than twice the wage due to compliance. Let’s not blame the worker for the decisions made by the legislature or the costs to administrate these rules.

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

comment image

anon
Guest
anon
Offline

How fortunate there is no cash incentive for media.
No way they could be a part of the problem at all.

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

comment image

anon
Guest
anon
Offline

Yeah, profit in the media is a really new and innovative idea for women. They’ve never made money that way.

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

http://jtf.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/hannity-trump-dummy.jpg

currently, there’s something else going on besides profit.

comment image

anon
Guest
anon
Offline

It was you who cited the problems with the corporatocracy and then went on to imply the press is somehow pure. i’m just stating the obvious….yes, I’m sure it’s probably not the point you wanted to make.

kfg
Guest
kfg
Offline

I was once trying to explain to a young city guy how in hot climates off the grid you can cool water (and thus anything you put in the water) by putting it out in the sun. He thought I was some kind of retard to think you could cool water by heating it. I pointed out that the refrigerators that are used off grid work by heating the exchange gas with a propane or kerosene flame instead of a compressor. But I think that just made him think I was a bigger retard, because it’s obvious you can’t cool… Read more »

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

Be honest. I never said the press was pure. I’m not even implying it. Go back, take off your blinders, and take a gander at the cartoon again. The corporatocracy is a huge problem. What they are actually doing is where folks get all in their feelings and ideology of left/right nonsense, and they know this. Obfuscation. It’s how you reliably get suckers to consistently vote against their long term self interest. ” According to a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report published in October 2007, the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan could cost taxpayers a total of $2.4 trillion… Read more »

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

This shit has real consequences when the curtain is pulled back.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KG4USJgZhoc&w=1280&h=720%5D

ollieoxenfree1
Guest

In a social context isn’t our instincts informed by our reasoning? Social interaction as it stands today wasn’t around long enough for us to exhibit any deep seated emotional or instinctive response to certain social cues. This might explain why men are so malleable to the precepts of the feminine imperative.

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

Ollie

Lol. When it’s raining really hard and someone says ” Goddamn leftist meteorologist ..”.

Lost Patrol
Guest
Lost Patrol
Offline

This is a deep water post followed by some heavy duty commentary. That’s why it’s fun to read here. I’m behind though. Still having trouble coming to grips with the idea of Blaximus carefully tending a suburban lawn.

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

Lol. I live in a semi urban area, so it’s not technically a suburban lawn.

anon
Guest
anon
Offline

“The corporatocracy is a huge problem. What they are actually doing is where folks get all in their feelings and ideology of left/right nonsense, and they know this.”

What is their mouthpiece…the mechanism by which they promote such “nonsense”?

“Obfuscation. It’s how you reliably get suckers to consistently vote against their long term self interest.”

People vote in favor of short term interests over long term interests all of the time….the key is short term incentives and socializing costs, privatizing gains.

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

” What is their mouthpiece…the mechanism by which they promote such “nonsense”?” Most media today, popular media, is practically pure shit. Even ESPN, sadly ( Go Fox Sports ), but the media doesn’t pass legislation. If media really influenced super large numbers of people, more of them would vote, first of all, and the PAC’s and SUPER PAC’s and lobbyist would really be shit out of luck. Lol, most of my fellow American’s don’t really know what the fuck is going on, or they have the right wing/ Left wing interpretation of it instead of the facts and truth of… Read more »

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

” ….the key is short term incentives and socializing costs, privatizing gains.”

Which brings me back to Tax Cuts and who benefitted and how and why.

comment image

and by comparison…. again..

comment image

rethink ” short term “.

anon
Guest
anon
Offline

Well, Blax, from what you stated above you should’ve noticed the heavy political machinations in the Republican party were working overtime during the last election to avoid the most popular choice. Then contrast this with how the Democratic party works. A political outsider candidate (regardless of what you might think of him personally) would NEVER happen there, because the Democratic party is already a machine. They don’t have to worry about an unpopular people’s choice because with their bought out superdelegates they don’t have to. And look at their choice of contender. An exceedingly rich and corrupt politician. Just sayin’… Read more »

theasdgamer
Guest

The Republican politicians talk the right wing talk, but mostly they walk the left wing walk. Generally, you have a choice between leftist #1 and leftist extremist #2. The Republican constituency, by contrast, is truly right wing.

I lost all respect for Cronkite when I heard his lies about what was going on in Viet Nam. For some reason he swung hard left at the end.

anon
Guest
anon
Offline

“I lost all respect for Cronkite when I heard his lies about what was going on in Viet Nam.”

My dad was a squadron commander in Vietnam and Cronkite interviewed him on television.
I wasn’t alive to see the interview, but I saw the still photos.
At any rate, Dad respected him and thought well of him. In hindsight, everyone has their flaws.

theasdgamer
Guest

Blax, seems like something that happened in 1972-3 affected the wages of low-skilled manufacturing workers. Was there maybe a “peace dividend”? And what has the impact of manufacturing/mining robots been on manufacturing and mining jobs?

I remember that Japan was killing automotive and electronics jobs in that period.

Then there have been all these “trade agreements” signed by leftist presidents like Nixon and Carter and Obama.

While we’re backing out of Nixon’s failed “War on Drugs,” now is also a good time to end Nixon’s insane trade deals that only move our jobs overseas and destroy our middle class.

MAGA

https://www.alternet.org/economy/how-richard-nixon-destroyed-american-manufacturing

Anonymous Reader
Guest
Anonymous Reader
Offline

ollieoxenfree1

In a social context isn’t our instincts informed by our reasoning?

No. Exactly the other way around.

Social interaction as it stands today wasn’t around long enough for us to exhibit any deep seated emotional or instinctive response to certain social cues.

No. Social cues can trigger instinctual responses that generate emotional reactions.

This might explain why men are so malleable to the precepts of the feminine imperative.

No. Three strikes…

theasdgamer
Guest

Cronkite: Who won and who lost in the great Tet Offensive against the cities? I’m not sure. The Vietcong did not win by a knockout but neither did we. The U.S. military, however, had grown more optimistic following the Tet Offensive. They saw in the successful rebuke of their enemies’ attacks an undeniable weakening of communist forces and strength. By departing from classical guerrilla tactics and assaulting southern cities, the North Vietnamese had unwittingly pitted themselves against their opponents’ greatest strengths. American organizational, material, and logistical superiority was quickly demonstrated in the early hours of the offensive, and the traditionally… Read more »

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

Lol.

Sooo…. we won the war and destroyed the communist influence. Got it. I’ll burn all my books and destroy my CD’s and have my memory promptly erased.

http://s.newsweek.com/sites/www.newsweek.com/files/styles/lg/public/2015/04/17/0417namfall01.jpg

comment image

comment image

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

anon When I was a child, I’d watch Cronkite on the evening news every night with my dad. I actually understood what he was saying. My friends all thought I was a freak watching that boring old man. As far as poltical parties go, imo they are both useless and corrupt ( in high numbers, with exceptions here and there ), and they both have sold out the American People. Personally, I don’t claim ” Left ” or ” Right “, even though I’m constantly called a Democrat for some strange reason…lol. The democrats definitely have a serious machine, but… Read more »

boulderhead
Guest

The “bomb” and the war on communism.meanwhile back at the ranch.

http://allthatsinteresting.com/hippie-communes

Today’s war on Jihad and tribalism in the middle East and abroad,meanwhile back at the ranch.

https://www.ft.com/content/f4e18952-157b-11e8-9e9c-25c814761640

boulderhead
Guest

That link didn’t work ,you get the poijnt.

“Us and them: how America divided into tribes
Amy Chua argues that both left and right are to blame for the rise of rancorous identity politics”

theasdgamer
Guest

As far as poltical parties go, imo they are both useless and corrupt ( in high numbers, with exceptions here and there ), and they both have sold out the American People. I agree with this to some degree. The democratic politicians are pretty much lockstep extreme leftists. The republican politicians are divided and many of them are leftists as well, tho not as extreme. The media is composed generally of extreme leftists and most republicans try to curry favor with them and end up despised by the republican base. Some few republicans haven’t sold out. We have a term… Read more »

Anonymous Reader
Guest
Anonymous Reader
Offline

stimulus. response.

Blaximus
Guest
Blaximus
Offline

Men should never ever venture into extremes. Right or left. That’s weak behavior and usually gets punished in some form or another. I recall when I was younger, stronger, meaner and faster, I was in the ring with a guy who was well known for releasing these massive flurries during a match, nonstop to try and overwhelm. Even though this was his ” thing “, opponents would still find themselves caught off guard by the extremity of his attack. Usually that stuff causes the average guy to cover up and go on the defensive. When he went all ballistic towards… Read more »

ollieoxenfree1
Guest

@Anonymous Reader April 14 4.34pm

This post of yours illustrates what I mean. In order to evaluate the written trigger “Three strikes” I had to be aware of baseball terminology and what it represents. I would’ve had to engage my general understanding of sporting vernacular before receiving an emotional response.
This is the point I was making in the post you dismissed.

Culum Struan
Guest
Culum Struan
Offline

Coincidentally I was just reading something about self-defence and fighting (Rory Miller and Marc MacYoung – highly recommended btw) and the author makes exactly the point that Blax makes – that “chain punching” or unleashing a flurry of punches can overwhelm an inexperienced fighter who basically goes defensive because his instincts don’t know what to do or how to respond, but against a trained fighter who has learned appropriate reflexes in how to deal with an attack, it usually means that the attacker is making a bunch of technical mistakes and leaving himself open to a targeted counter-attack. Or to… Read more »

%d bloggers like this: